D-6

MetalCraftSolved

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Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Location
NC
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jeepinmatt

At least half the people are dumber than the rest
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Location
Stanley, NC
I has a cat
 

72Rockcruiser

Actually Wheels Now!?!
Joined
Mar 22, 2005
Location
Charlotte, NC
I thought this was gonna be a Bulldozer build thread.

Maybe something like this one:

 

jeepinmatt

At least half the people are dumber than the rest
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Location
Stanley, NC

Mac5005

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Location
Rocky Mount
In, thanks for the chance.

















:popcorn:



















I guess I need to delete my other thread about pirate ending lol lol lol lol


But because this is a build thread, and not chit chat.

Why is the rear wms so much wider than the front?

How much clearance is there between driver left thigh, and driver front tire at full lock and full stuff, when steering towards the driver side?

Why the nose heavy design with what 48”+ long rear links?

Just seems like rear sprung:unsprung mass ratio looks low or close to equal.
 
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WARRIORWELDING

Owner opperator Of WarriorWelding LLC.
Joined
Jan 6, 2008
Location
Chillin, Hwy 64 Mocksville NC
What kind of software is this? I am intrigued. Also impressed because it seems like it would be time consuming from the detail.


Y'all fellas are hard.....
 

MetalCraftSolved

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Location
NC
why it got 5 guys standing around with hardhats?

That's the construction crew on hand to erect the new shop.

Will there be an LGP model?

Limited Gene Pool model? Your lookin at it.


When I saw this I immediately typed A-4 in Google search and it pulled up the
A-4 Skyhawk, Light attack aircraft for the United States Navy.

Why is the rear wms so much wider than the front?

How much clearance is there between driver left thigh, and driver front tire at full lock and full stuff, when steering towards the driver side?

Why the nose heavy design with what 48”+ long rear links?

Just seems like rear sprung:unsprung mass ratio looks low or close to equal.

The rear wheel mount surface width is identical to the front when the front tires are at static ride height. The pictures shown are with the tires at bump, which involves the front tires moving inward following the geometry of the independent front control arms.

The drivers left thigh will be safely nestled inside the drivers seat, away from the tire at bump / driver lock.

You lost me with the nose heavy design, long rear links, and the un-sprung mass ratio. You might have to talk me through it a little more so I can pick up on it.

What kind of software is this?

The software is Rhino
 

Ron

Dum Spiro Spero
Moderator
Joined
Apr 16, 2005
Location
Sharon, SC
Could the bottom end of the engine be rebuilt in a trailer , in the car, in the rain and mud?

i think that’s a critical design consideration
 

MetalCraftSolved

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Location
NC
Could the bottom end of the engine be rebuilt in a trailer , in the car, in the rain and mud?

i think that’s a critical design consideration

I suppose the skid plate could be dropped. Things could be repaired in the bottom end of the LS if absolutely necessary, but I doubt you'll catch me working on the inside of a $25,000 - $30,000 LS. I'd just pull it out, ship it back to the engine builder and tell them they've got some raggedy ass cranks.
 

MetalCraftSolved

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Location
NC
why front engine?

Such a simple question that demands an acute explanation. I feel like this is one of those worm hole questions that I need to navigate with precision.

I would venture out there to say that most everyone knows the challenge an Ultra 4 race car faces is climbing hills, rocks and attempting to track through the desert at really high speeds.

Let's assume that when the car is going up hill, that a large total weight percentage of the car is putting pressure on the rear end. This begs the question of why? Why would I want to put the engine in the rear of the vehicle, loading more responsibility onto the rear end? I have a perfectly good race duty front suspension. I'm not going to treat the IFS system on the front of this car like it's fragile. No. I'm gonna charge it with community service.



For me, this boils down to 2 things.

1 - Having enough weight on the front end to push the tires back down to the ground as quick as possible while I'm hauling the mail over bumps. I have to be able to steer this thing. If the front end of my car is bouncing around and flying in the air, I have no traction to steer.

2 - Get the front tire patch over the apex of a ledge and I've won most of the battle. Given, your gonna run into spots where the talent tank needs to be involved, but if I'm traveling over 3 miles per hour I've lost all visual and mental acuity with the rear end. It's not taking up any percentage of brain space at this point. I'm full bore on getting those front tires in position to climb over a correct line. Apex, apex, apex, I'm just zoned in on the rocks in front of me getting the weight of my front tires on an apex, because if I've done that, I've already beat the bully.

Most of us know what the little Rock Hill looks like at the flats? As soon as I had 4 tires on that rock garden, I would be setting my front tires up on a line half way up that thing that would allow me to just rip on the throttle, and come off the top in a fury with all 4 tires diggin for a trophy.

I would go out of my way to have a larger percentage of weight on the front half of the car.
 

BRUISER

silent.. but deadly
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Location
Raleigh
Such a simple question that demands an acute explanation. I feel like this is one of those worm hole questions that I need to navigate with precision.

I would venture out there to say that most everyone knows the challenge an Ultra 4 race car faces is climbing hills, rocks and attempting to track through the desert at really high speeds.

Let's assume that when the car is going up hill, that a large total weight percentage of the car is putting pressure on the rear end. This begs the question of why? Why would I want to put the engine in the rear of the vehicle, loading more responsibility onto the rear end? I have a perfectly good race duty front suspension. I'm not going to treat the IFS system on the front of this car like it's fragile. No. I'm gonna charge it with community service.



For me, this boils down to 2 things.

1 - Having enough weight on the front end to push the tires back down to the ground as quick as possible while I'm hauling the mail over bumps. I have to be able to steer this thing. If the front end of my car is bouncing around and flying in the air, I have no traction to steer.

2 - Get the front tire patch over the apex of a ledge and I've won most of the battle. Given, your gonna run into spots where the talent tank needs to be involved, but if I'm traveling over 3 miles per hour I've lost all visual and mental acuity with the rear end. It's not taking up any percentage of brain space at this point. I'm full bore on getting those front tires in position to climb over a correct line. Apex, apex, apex, I'm just zoned in on the rocks in front of me getting the weight of my front tires on an apex, because if I've done that, I've already beat the bully.

Most of us know what the little Rock Hill looks like at the flats? As soon as I had 4 tires on that rock garden, I would be setting my front tires up on a line half way up that thing that would allow me to just rip on the throttle, and come off the top in a fury with all 4 tires diggin for a trophy.

I would go out of my way to have a larger percentage of weight on the front half of the car.

Sorry to say you got some learning to do.
What you explained is not how an ifs rear engine car works at all. There are many ways to get down force on the wheels at all times. But it is your build so build what you like and what you want. I will follow along as I many build a buggy some day :)
 

Mac5005

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2005
Location
Rocky Mount
Google polar moment of inertia.

Research the effects of sprung mass vs unsprung mass.

The front tires are easy to control bc they steer.

Controlling yaw in a dynamically changing environment of tires that don’t steer is a different but connected issue.
 

MetalCraftSolved

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Location
NC
Sorry to say you got some learning to do.
What you explained is not how an ifs rear engine car works at all.

I didn't explain an ifs rear engine car. How many rear engine cars have your raced? I've raced 3 different ones.

Google polar moment of inertia.

Research the effects of sprung mass vs unsprung mass.

The front tires are easy to control bc they steer.

Controlling yaw in a dynamically changing environment of tires that don’t steer is a different but connected issue.

Yaw? You mean like "yaw" steering my car into polar ice?
 

BRUISER

silent.. but deadly
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2005
Location
Raleigh
I didn't explain an ifs rear engine car. How many rear engine cars have your raced? I've raced 3 different ones.

which cars and what race series? maybe if you told me who you are, I would know but "metalCraftSolved" and making statements like you did above make you look like a noob that has some cool computer software to draw stuff
 
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